Mummy

Keeping a Corpse from Stinking. (For Now)

Necromones are fatty acids in insects associated with decomposition and are a strong signal for members of the same species to stay away—possibly to protect others from catching a contagion. Like animals, humans have putrefaction volatiles that act as necromones. This ability to sense death, decomposition or disease is important, it serves the survival of a species. This Thursday Thought poses the question, can you sense when an organisation is dying?

Blue Footed Booby

The Booby Trap: Respecting Rituals for Corporate Change makers

The Blue-Footed Booby has evolved to no longer build a nest in which to lay their eggs. The modern Booby lays eggs on the ground. Therefore, this ritual is decorative, it serves no practical purpose, it is a remnant of their evolutionary ancestor.So what has this got to do with corporate culture and corporate innovation? Quite a lot, I believe.

Murmurations of Leadership: Uncertainty but Consensus

Experts believe birds come together in compact masses because grouping together offers safety in numbers from predators, such as falcons. Such predators find it hard to target one bird in the middle of a hypnotising flock of up to thousands. Other reasons for murmurations include include the warmth of a group at night during the winter. They also gather to exchange information, such as good feeding areas. Organisations can learn a lot from such behaviour.

Cleopatra movie 1963

Sycophant or Triumphant?

Sycophants are not wondering what is best for the organisation, they are only interested in what is best for them. If you ask them about for a SWOT analysis of your company product or opportunities for disruption, they will spout some generic nonsense. However, ask them about section 2, article 3c, paragraph 2 of the company handbook and they will recite it to the letter. In essence, they know how to survive in an organisation all the way to pension, riding on the coattails of those in power.

Elephant-V-Ymir

The Harryhausen Effect – Fear Drives Resistance

Working in corporation change is fraught with many challenges. One of these challenges is ostracisation and rejection of the change agent by the corporate immune system. It is useful to understand why this resistance can be expected. Many change makers struggle with this apparent rejection by their colleagues and with the inevitable frustration due to the glacial speed of progress. The reasons for such phenomena are as manifold as the obstacles one must overcome. However, for this Thursday Thought, let’s consider a core reason why change is so difficult: the fear of the unknown.

Chaos IS a Ladder

Chaos is a Ladder, Not a Pit

One of the challenges that so many organisations and individuals face is that we have grown accustomed to a steady and stable environment. The relative stability of the post-war period, an anomalous period in world history, has somewhat contributed to our conditioning for stability. As a result, our mental and operational flexibility has atrophied. Progress and change only happen when we adapt, when we permanent reinvent, when we understand that chaos and order are bedfellows.

Girl with a finger on her lips

When Good People Go Quiet: A Swiss Cheese Model of Idea Penetration

Swiss cheese Model for Ideas Aidan McCullen. Have you noticed a colleague who was once full of ideas, who has gone unusually quiet? Perhaps you may assume they are just disinterested? You may think they are having a bad day? Perhaps instead, they have fallen prey to a corporate lobotomy? Perhaps they are worn down? Perhaps they just couldn’t be bothered any more.

Tree Monster by Alexandra Schastlivaya

Organisational Dieback – The Natural Evolution of Organisations

What does Tree Dieback have to do with leadership? Nature instinctively knows what to do to ensure the survival of a species, but we homo sapiens can make things much more complicated than they might otherwise be. Biases, blind spots and clinging to the status quo block our progress. Being aware of this is the first step.