Stories-Dice-and-Rocks-That-Think_-How-Humans-Learned-to-See-the-Future-and-Shape-It-with-Byron-Rees

Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think Act II with Byron Reese

Today we focus on ACT II of Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think: How Humans Learned to See the Future and Shape It with Byron Reese

Act II: In 17th century France, the mathematical framework known as ‘probability theory’ is born—a science for seeing into the future that we used to build the modern world

We welcome back the author of “Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think: How Humans Learned to See the Future–and Shape It” friend of the show, Byron Reese.

Dalmatian

Innovation Atomisation: Falling To Pieces

If you look at the image, it takes only a small effort to see the contours of a Dalmatian sniffing the ground. However, here is the point, without the previously stored higher-level concept “dog”, if we were only to use “the parts”, we would see only a meaningless pattern of white and black dots. We would focus on the parts and miss the big picture.

Byron Reese

Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think Act I with Byron Reese

In today’s episode, our guest argues that we humans owe our special status to our ability to imagine the future and recall the past, escaping the perpetual present that all other living creatures are trapped in.   
We welcome back the author of “Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think: How Humans Learned to See the Future–and Shape It” friend of the show, Byron Reese.

Iain McGilchrist – The Matter With Things Part 1

Our guest suggests that in order to understand ourselves and the world we need science and intuition, reason and imagination, not just one or two; that they are in any case far from being in conflict; and that the brain’s right hemisphere plays the most important part in each. And he shows us how to recognise the ‘signature’ of the left hemisphere in our thinking, so as to avoid making decisions that bring disaster in their wake. Following the paths of cutting-edge neurology, philosophy and physics, he reveals how each leads us to a similar vision of the world, one that is both profound and beautiful – and happens to be in line with the deepest traditions of human wisdom. It is a vision that returns the world to life, and us to a better way of living in it: one we must embrace if we are to survive. It is a pleasure to welcome the author of “The Matter With Things: Our Brains, Our Delusions, and the Unmaking of the World” Iain McGilchrist

Cycling against the wind

Organisational Stress Wood: Struggle Builds Resilience

So often the challenge is that we focus on the failure rather than the learnings. When we focus on failure, we become cognitively impaired and we cannot think creatively. We must reframe our relationship with struggle.

As the saying goes, “kites rise against, not with the wind.”

Frank Barrett

Yes to the Mess Part 2: Surprising Leadership Lessons from Jazz with Frank Barrett

The premise of today’s book is that nurturing spontaneity, creativity , experimentation, and dynamic synchronization is no longer an optional approach to leadership. It’s the only approach. The current velocity of change demands nothing less. It demands paying attention to the mental models, the cultural beliefs and values, the practices and structures that support improvisation.

We welcome back the author of: “Yes to the Mess: Surprising Leadership Lessons from Jazz”, Frank Barrett.

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