Cliff Goldmacher

EP 245: The Reason For The Rhymes: Mastering the Seven Essential Skills of Innovation by Learning to Write Songs with Cliff Goldmacher

The Reason For The Rhymes: Mastering the Seven Essential Skills of Innovation by Learning to Write Songs with Cliff Goldmacher

Robert Sapolsky

EP 244: “Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst” – Robert M. Sapolsky

Robert Sapolsky’s Behave is one of the most dazzling tours de horizon of the science of human behavior ever attempted, a majestic synthesis that harvests cutting-edge research across a range of disciplines to provide a subtle and nuanced perspective on why we ultimately do the things we do…for good and for ill.

The_Innovaton_Show_Aidan_McCullen

EP 244: “Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst” – Robert M. Sapolsky.

One of my favourite episodes of all time.

This genre-shattering attempt to answer the question of human behaviour by looking at it from every angle.

Our guest starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person’s reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs, and then hops back in time from there, in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its genetic inheritance.

And so the first category of explanation is the neurobiological one. What goes on in a person’s brain a second before the behavior happens?

Then he pulls out to a slightly larger field of vision, a little earlier in time: What sight, sound, or smell triggers the nervous system to produce that behavior?

And then, what hormones act hours to days earlier to change how responsive that individual is to the stimuli which trigger the nervous system?

By now, our guest has increased our field of vision so that we are thinking about neurobiology and the sensory world of our environment and endocrinology in trying to explain what happened.

But he keeps going—next to what features of the environment affected that person’s brain, and then back to the childhood of the individual, and then to their genetic makeup.

Finally, he expands the view to encompass factors larger than that one individual. How culture has shaped that individual’s group, what ecological factors helped shape that culture, and on and on, back to evolutionary factors thousands and even millions of years old.

The result is one of the most dazzling tours de horizon of the science of human behavior ever attempted, a majestic synthesis that harvests cutting-edge research across a range of disciplines to provide a subtle and nuanced perspective on why we ultimately do the things we do…for good and for ill.

Wise, humane, often hilarious, Behave is a towering achievement, powerfully humanising, and downright heroic in its own right.

What a pleasure to welcome author of “Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst” Robert M. Sapolsky

Mark Esposito,

EP 243: Understanding How the Future Unfolds: Using Drive to Harness the Power of Today’s Megatrends with Mark Esposito

Mark Esposito shares a fresh, holistic way to think about tomorrow by preparing for it today: He calls it DRIVE.

The DRIVE framework examines five interrelated megatrends: 

• Demographic and social changes
• Resource scarcity
• Inequalities
• Volatility, complexity, and scale
• Enterprising dynamics 

Mental Agility or Corporate Change of Direction?

Change of direction training is not the same as agility training. Change of direction training prepares an athlete for predictable, steady situations. Agility helps the athlete’s overall performance. Agility includes cognitive agility.

In a world of rapid change. Reactive decision making must bolster proactive decision making. Reactive decision making is a key ingredient for flexible mindsets required for a world amid rapid change.

Image of Guy Lezischner

EP 241: The Nocturnal Brain: Tales of Nightmares and Neuroscience with Guy Leschziner

The Nocturnal Brain: Tales of Nightmares and Neuroscience with Guy Leschziner

You can survive longer without food than without sleep. The fact that sleep is fundamental to life is unarguable, but in modern society, at least until recently, we have taken for granted that sleep simply happens, and is a necessary evil to allow us to live our waking lives. Recently, however, there has been a shift in how we view sleep. Rather than being a hindrance to our working and social lives, a biological process that keeps us from being productive, the concept of the importance of sleep is percolating through. Its role in the maintenance of our physical and mental health, our sporting prowess, our cognitive abilities, even in our happiness, is slowly being appreciated. And rightly so. People are taking sleep seriously

The normal expectation of waking up feeling ready for the day ahead is rarely found among our guests patients. Their nights are tormented by a range of conditions, such as terrifying nocturnal hallucinations, sleep paralysis, acting out their dreams or debilitating insomnia. The array of activities in sleep reflects the spectrum of human behaviour in our waking lives. Sometimes these medical problems have a biological explanation, at other times a psychological one, and the focus of the clinical work that He and his colleagues do is to unravel the causes for their sleep disorders and attempt to find a treatment or cure.

More about Guy here: https://guyleschziner.com/