Orpheus

Orpheus and The Business World: Organisational Drag & Gravitational Pull

The legend of Orpheus and Eurydice is a story of love, faith and transformation. It provides a wonderful analogy for letting go of the past and having faith in the future.

To transform we must let go of the way things used to be. Yes, we must respect the old order of things, but then let go.

Barbara Oakley Innovation Show

Learn Like a Pro with Barbara Oakley

Barbara Oakley struggled in the past with our learning. But has found techniques to help us master material—any material. Building on insights from neuroscience and cognitive psychology, she gives us a crash course to improve your ability to learn, whether you’re studying maths, language, coding, karate, cooking, or anything else. You’ll see why the strategies work because you’ll see what’s happening in the brain when you use them. No, this isn’t a little book of miracles.

But you will find that reducing frustration and improving your study success may sometimes feel miraculous.

Mummy

Keeping a Corpse from Stinking. (For Now)

Necromones are fatty acids in insects associated with decomposition and are a strong signal for members of the same species to stay away—possibly to protect others from catching a contagion. Like animals, humans have putrefaction volatiles that act as necromones. This ability to sense death, decomposition or disease is important, it serves the survival of a species. This Thursday Thought poses the question, can you sense when an organisation is dying?

Blue Footed Booby

The Booby Trap: Respecting Rituals for Corporate Change makers

The Blue-Footed Booby has evolved to no longer build a nest in which to lay their eggs. The modern Booby lays eggs on the ground. Therefore, this ritual is decorative, it serves no practical purpose, it is a remnant of their evolutionary ancestor.So what has this got to do with corporate culture and corporate innovation? Quite a lot, I believe.

Murmurations of Leadership: Uncertainty but Consensus

Experts believe birds come together in compact masses because grouping together offers safety in numbers from predators, such as falcons. Such predators find it hard to target one bird in the middle of a hypnotising flock of up to thousands. Other reasons for murmurations include include the warmth of a group at night during the winter. They also gather to exchange information, such as good feeding areas. Organisations can learn a lot from such behaviour.